Breakfast: Sweet Potato Hashbrowns & Egg

This morning, I tried a recipe that I’d seen floating around Facebook. I had never tried making sweet potato hash browns and I loved the idea of doing a whole pan full to feed my crew of 5 + my hubby. It took about 10 minutes to prep the sweet potato hash browns.

I used to eat white and red potatoes and loved the hash browns from Waffle House. But, here’s the deal — sweet potatoes are such a better choice if you’re going to eat a potato. Here’s a quick infographic comparing the two. Which is better to put in your body? (Hint: Check out those Vitamin A numbers!) I disagree with one thing on their infographic — where they say not to forget about white potatoes (towards the bottom)… if you have PCOS, forget the white potatoes. They will make your pancreas work harder to produce more insulin which then if unused turns to fat. Steer clear of those white and red potatoes.

sweet potato vs white potato

Vitamin A is GREAT for kids especially, because they are GROWING! It is an essential vitamin needed for growth and development, cell recognition, vision, immune function and reproduction.

The recommended intake of vitamin A varies according to age and sex. Because vitamin A is available in several forms, the vitamin A content in foods is often measured as retinol activity equivalents (RAEs). One RAE is equal to 1 microgram of retinol, 12 micrograms of beta-carotene or 3.33 IU of vitamin A. The recommended intake of RAEs for people of different ages according to the National Institutes for Health (NIH) are as follows:

  • 0-6 months*: 400 mcg/day
  • 7-12 months*: 500 mcg/day
  • 1-3 years: 300 mcg/day
  • 4-8 years: 400 mcg/day
  • 9-13 years: 600 mcg/day
  • 14+ years (male): 900 mcg/day
  • 14+ years (female): 700 mcg/day
  • 14-18 years (pregnancy): 750 mcg/day
  • 14-18 years (lactation): 1,200 mcg/day
  • 19-50 years (pregnancy): 770 mcg/day
  • 19-50 years (lactation): 1,300 mcg/day.

* Adequate Intake (AI), equivalent to the mean intake of vitamin A in healthy, breastfed infants.

My kids (ages 3, 6, 11, and two 15-year-olds) all ate this for breakfast — even my picky six year old son! I like how this sort of portion-controls the sweet potato for the insulin response. I encourage you to give it a try and see what YOU think! Once you make it, be sure to leave your review in the comments below! 🙂

Sweet Potato and Egg Cups

Sweet Potato Cup and Egg

Sweet Potato and Egg Cups

  • Servings: 12
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

PCOSbitesSweet Potato and Egg Cups

INGREDIENTS:
• 1 medium sweet potato, shredded
• 2 TBSP Coconut Oil or Canola Oil or melted Ghee
• 12 large eggs
• Kelp Seasoning
• Fresh Parsley
• Pink Himalayan Salt
• Pepper

NON-FOOD ITEMS YOU WILL NEED:
• Cupcake Tin
• Grater
• Bowl
• Peeler
• Pair of kitchen shears (to cut up your parsley)

INSTRUCTIONS
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
2. Grease a muffin pan with a TBSP of oil of choice or ghee.
3. Peel your sweet potato and then grate the sweet potato into a bowl, so you have a little over one cup.
4. Mix in 1 TBSP of oil of choice, salt, and pepper with the sweet potato and even coat the shredded potato with mixture.
5. Evenly divide the grated sweet potato into each muffin hole (however many you wish to make) and press the grated sweet potato down the bottom and sides so they form cups.

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Tip: If you don’t have a large crew you’re needing to make these for, just fill in the number of cups you need and put the remainder in a Ziplock bag and place in the fridge to use in another dish or the next day.

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6. Bake sweet potato cups for 15 minutes.
7. When the sweet potato cups are done baking, crack an egg into each cup carefully without breaking the yolk.

Egg in partially baked sweet potato cup

egg in sweet potato cups

8. Return the pan to the oven and bake another 15-20 minutes until the egg whites are set.

Hint: You want it to be a little glossy on top when it comes out as it will continue to cook after you remove it from the heat.

9. Let it cool for 10 minutes before taking them out of the tin.
10. Top with some freshly chopped parsley (simple fold the parsley together and cut with your kitchen shears), sprinkle on some kelp seasoning for iodine benefits, and ground Pink Himalayan Salt and ground Pepper.

Tip: Add some sort of protein to this as well on the side, like a chicken or turkey sausage.

 

This recipe is refined-sugar free, gluten-free, corn-free, and lactose-free.

refinedsugar-freegluten-freecorn-freelactose-free

enjoy PCOSbites recipe footer

 

Source: Medical News Today and Cleveland Health Clinic.

How Kelp can Help

When I read that kelp was highly beneficial for my body as a great source of iodine, I was a bit dumbstruck. How on earth was I going to get kelp into my diet? Sushi was off the list because of rice, and I knew that I did NOT want to take another pill. So online I went in search of an easy win. And this is what I came up with …

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I have found it’s easy to add to scrambled eggs, on top of a salad – you name it! You can’t notice the flavor at all which is a win for me after I had tried one of those kelp “snacks” which was just a flavored sheet of kelp.

I’m following the Blood Type eating plan, but many of these foods can be beneficial for those looking to eat better. The Blood Type eating plan focuses on limiting foods where the lectins in the foods react like poison, if you will, within your body. All plants have lectins in them to help protect them against predators. It’s not just insects, birds, and animals that can be influenced by these lectins in plants, but also our bodies. And, research has shown that each blood type reacts differently to different lectins in foods. The lectins can do several harmful things within your body. It can settle in an area and act like a glue. It can also act like the hormone, insulin and let in glucose to fuel the cell, but unlike the insulin, it won’t release and so the cell just continues to fill. If you want to learn more, you can watch this short video that helped me to understand what happens within our bodies with lectins. I was really skeptical when I first started eliminating foods that were on my “do not eat” list because of how the lectins in them reacted with my blood, but I can tell you that after only two weeks of eating according to this food plan, MY JOINT PAIN WAS GONE!  I’m now thinking there is something to this after personally experiencing more energy and no more chronic pain. So, if you have O+ blood type you’ll definitely want to add kelp to your diet as it is highly beneficial (it will help your body heal).

Update: I also found this dropper of kelp that you can add to your water or other liquids while cooking. I just add a dropper to my morning and afternoon water and I don’t even taste it! Awesome!

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